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Taveuni

Brochure Designs for Paradise in Fiji

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Brochure Designs for Paradise in Fiji

3 fold flyer

We have just completed our contracts with Paradise Taveuni, and we are spending the next couple of months with family on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. Jack has completed a plethora of projects for the resort, and we're excited to see the printed materials and products. Here are some samples of brochures Jack has designed for the resort. They will be used for promotions within Fiji, Australia, the U.S., New Zealand, and other locations.

3 fold flyer 3 fold flyer2 Dive Brochure Resort Brochure

Wedding Brochure 50 percent specials

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Renewable Energy and Organic Gardening on Taveuni

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Renewable Energy and Organic Gardening on Taveuni

Nakia organic garden

Over the weekend, we headed north to visit Nakia Resort, owned by Jim and Robin Kelly. We've been eager to check out Nakia, as it is an eco-resort that employs sustainable practices that we’d love to see more of in Fiji. Jim was kind enough to give us a tour focusing on their renewable energy system and their organic garden. Nakia's terraced organic garden

Like most of Fiji, Taveuni is off the grid, leaving most resorts to rely on diesel generators for energy. Nakia Resort runs on renewable energy- a combination of hydro, solar and wind energy. They maintain back up generators in case the system goes down; however, they are usually able to supply 100% of the resort's power using their hybrid renewable system.

Jim Kelly is self-taught on this subject; he learned the ins and outs so that he could be a thoughtful consumer and employ the best practices. He showed us his hybrid system and shared some of the lessons he learned and challenges he faced. Since diesel generators have been a standard, he pioneered these systems on Taveuni.

The property includes four bures, the owners' home, and the main complex and restaurant. Nakia uses fans rather than air conditioning, further reducing the energy demand.

The hydro electric system is Nakia’s biggest energy producer, providing roughly 75% of all of the resort’s energy.

Hydro

Their rooftop solar PV system is the second biggest energy provider. Nakia has one wind generator with a capacity of 1,000 watts, and this provides the least amount of energy.

Nakia's wind turbine

They store the energy in a 48-volt battery system, and convert the stored energy to 240 volts using a 5,000 watt invertor that receives and tracks the incoming power.

Jim also gave us a tour of their beautiful organic farm. They are growing a variety of vegetables, fruits and herbs organically: including lettuce, tomatoes, a variety of beans, broccoli, cabbage, bok choy, tapioca, squash, papaya, watermelon, basil, parsley, and much more.

Jim and Jack touring the garden

They keep a small herb garden outside of the kitchen and a large garden out back. The large garden is terraced and includes a sprinkler system.  At the bottom, they have a compost heap with a chipper. When they started the garden, they sprayed Neem oil to prevent insects and fungus. However, Jim has found they haven't needed it since and have not used it in about 8 years. Now they rely on traditional practices of crop rotation, composting, and plant pairing.

Compost Heap

Tavenui is known as the garden island of Fiji because of its rich volcanic soil. Yet, many farmers today rely heavily on the use of  chemical fertilizers, pesticides and insecticides. Jim gives tours of their organic garden to students from the local schools; he tells the students that he did not invent these methods, and that their grandparents farmed this way.

Young yaqona plants

We also got to peak in the stunning kitchen which is the perfect complement to the garden.

We’re so glad we were able to check out Nakia before we left. The visit left us feeling inspired and hopeful for the future of Fiji’s land and tourism.

 

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Learning to Dive

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Learning to Dive

Jack and Mark

Last week I completed my Open Water Dive Certificate at Paradise Taveuni through Pro Dive Taveuni! It was a truly unforgettable experience, and a fairly easy thing to do. Pro Dive offers an extensive selection of courses, dive gear and sites; and is operated by a professional and knowledgeable Dive Team led by PADI Dive instructor and resort owner, Allan Gortan. Pro Dive Taveuni also has a fleet of custom made boats that provide access to the pristine reefs surrounding the Garden Island of Taveuni. The Course: Step One: Snorkel off the pristine waterfront at Paradise, where you can witness the labyrinth of lava flow covered by various hard and soft corral. There are innumerable fish from the majestic Parrot Fish to the elusive Leather Jacket. Here, your thirst will grow to explore more.

Step two: Take your Dive course which you can purchase and complete online. This gives you the flexibility to work at your own pace, anytime, anywhere within a 12 month period. I was very fortunate as I was presented the NASE online dive course as a wedding gift from Alise's family friends (owners/operators of Cocoa Beach Scuba Odyssey) who were also her instructors.  I was also lucky to catch NASE instructor, Mark Santa-Maria on his last few days at Paradise.

The course will introduce you to the fundamentals of diving- the various techniques, dive theory, and worst case scenarios. There are risks with diving, but if steps are followed diligently, you will have an amazing time. Once you have finished all your reading and/or watching videos, you will take an exam, answering various questions about diving and having a safe enjoyable dive.

Jack in the pool with Mark

Step Three: The Practical. Here you will put to test the skills and knowledge you learned from the online course. The first two sessions will take place in the safety of the pool. Your instructor will show you everything from setting up your gear to how to enter the water, fixing problems underwater such as clearing your mask, runaway regulators, and the special hand signal signals used to communicate specific situations and directions. Step four: Time to get in the Ocean. To complete your open water course you must log 2 shore dives and 2 boat dives. Here is where you really get to apply your new set of knowledge and skills like 'diving like a fish'. As the reef is a delicate system of hard and soft corrals, aquatic life and things that could hurt you if not careful, it is important to maintain neutral buoyancy using your lungs to ascend or descend. Nowadays, divers are equipped with a handy dive computer that tells you your depth, ascension rate, and dive time and features a convenient safety stop timer (safety stop: 15ft or 6-4.5 meters below the surface where you wait for 3 minutes so the nitrogen in you body safely leaves your blood stream). When you follow all the steps and procedures you can have the time of your life. Once you have completed your dives and logged the necessary time, that's it! You are now certified to dive anywhere in the world. As a final test and introduction to the deep, my instructor took me down to 100 feet, and acted out a panicked diver scenario that just ran out of air! Thanks, Mark. Succeeding in this left me feeling confident and eager to explore more of the underwater world!

Click here to find out more how to get Certified to Dive at Paradise Taveuni.

Paradise Taveuni

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Rabi and Kioa

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Rabi and Kioa

Kioa

Yesterday, we went to the islands of Rabi (RAH-mbe) and Kioa (key-OH-uh). We went with our coworkers to offer sevusevu to the villages that may be hosting Paradise guests in the future. Sepo and the waka

Jack mixing kava on boat

Even though the islands were only an hour or two away, it felt like we were travelling internationally. Both islands are home to people who were relocated from other Pacific islands. Their languages, building styles, and cultural traditions differ from what we’ve experienced in Fijian communities.

Rabi

Our coworker, Atu's wife is from Rabi

We visited Rabi first. Rabi has four villages, a town area, and a guesthouse for the occasional tourists. We visited the town area, which is pretty far from the villages.

Rabi jetty

The people of Rabi are originally from Banaba Island (aka Ocean Island), a solitary raised coral island near the Equator that today is politically a part of the Republic of Kiribati. The British Phosphate Commission (a joint British, Australian, and New Zealand enterprise) carried out phosphate mining on Banaba Island from around 1900 to 1979, and subsequently stripped away 90% of the island’s surface. After World War II, the Banabans were told they could not return to their homeland as it was uninhabitable, and they were relocated to Rabi Island in Fiji. A series of injustices and coercion predicated the relocation.

The four villages on Rabi Island are the same as the four that were on Banaba Island. We found that there were no chiefs, as in Fijian villages, and they do not do the Fijian tradition of sevusevu. We experienced Banaban music dancing during the catholic church celebrations in Wairiki.

Banaban dancers

The Banaban people have worked to preserve their identity. They also share their culture and story of displacement through their own website.

After Rabi, we visited Kioa. Kioa has only one village that is adjacent to a beautiful white beach.

Kioa

Polynesian canoes in Kioa

Kioa

The people of Kioa came from the Vaitupu atoll in Tuvalu. The first group arrived to Kioa around the same time as the Banabans did to Rabi, however they came under very different circumstances. Some of the men in Vaitupu assisted the Americans during World War II and used the money they made to purchase the uninhabited island of Kioa. They bought the island as a solution to the potential overcrowding of Vaitupu, and a small group of people made the journey to become the first Kioans.

Bridge on Kioa

Kioa

Sepo carrying sevusevu from the boat

The sevusevu we offered there was understood and welcomed. Kioa also has a website.

Some of our Paradise team in Kioa

It was really exciting for us to experience the diversity within Fiji.

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Diwali Kids' Mural

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Diwali Kids' Mural

October 23rd marked Diwali (or Deepavali)- the Hindu Festival of lights. Diwali is a lunar holiday, celebrated on the darkest new moon night on the calendar. Celebrations here included firecrackers and lots of sweets.
Diwali is a public holiday so the local schools had the day off. Jack and I did not have the day off, but were able to celebrate through work. We had 16 kids join in painting one of the containers at the resort.
Jack painting container
We had previously started painting another container at the resort and got a feel for how it would work.
Kids sketching
We showed the kids a few basic organic designs in the classroom, and we showed them how to use leaves as stencils, We also gave a quick lesson in color theory. We didn't have the best paints for the job, but we did have gloves and a very cooperative team of children so it was a relatively mess-free project.
Jack demonstrating
Girls hard at work

We mixed colors and cleaned brushes while they went to work. We gave the kids free range of the composition and color choices. The painting was limited to the areas the kids could reach, but they did a great job of filling those areas with bright designs!

Kids with mural

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Views from Matei

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Views from Matei

Taveuni view

Taveuni, the third largest island in Fiji, has a total land area of just 169 square miles (434 square kilometers). Yet, the challenges of transportation (untimely buses, rocky roads, work schedules, etc) keep us on the south side of the island, usually at the resort.One weekend we did manage to get out for a lovely getaway to the north side. We went to see our friends, Keni and TC in Matei. It was only about an hour’s drive from the resort, and well worth it.

Keni, Jack and TC

We met Keni and TC in the states- he is Fijian and she is American. Jack first met them about 10 years ago, when Jack was working at Peet’s Coffee in Oakland. Jack was wearing his sulu vataga to work, and Keni was waiting in line. Keni spotted the sulu vataga and yelled “BULA!!!” The rest is history!

Keni is from Taveuni and this is where he and TC met. They currently live in Oakland but still have their home on the northern side of Taveuni. When they came to Taveuni, they invited us up to see their beautiful home and the surrounding area.

Keni and Jack

Even though it's relatively close, the north side of the island has a very different coast. It was actually our first time stepping on a sandy beach since we’d been in Fiji! Down where we are, there are volcanic rocks, but no sand.

Matei Beach

Keni and TC took us out kayaking to a nearby island. The views were absolutely breathtaking!

Kayaking Taveuni

They also hooked us up with a supply of some of our favorites: uto (breadfruit), jina (bananas), papaya and bu (coconut)!

Fruit

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Lovo, Music and Yaqona

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Lovo, Music and Yaqona

Once a week, Paradise puts on a Fiji Night. On Fiji night a lovo, or feast cooked in the earth, is prepared for the resort guests. Guests are also entertained with Fijian music and dancing. The night ends with music, storytelling and yaqona (yah-ngo-nah) also known as kava. Nico and the love

The lovo tradition is common in the Pacific islands; it is known as a hangi in New Zealand, imu in Hawaii, and umu in Samoa, Tonga and the Cook Islands. The lovo is a pit that is about a foot and a half deep. Kindling and wood are stacked into a platform where rocks are piled on top. A fire is lit and left to burn for a couple of hours. Then the leftover wood and embers are removed from the pit, leaving only the hot rocks. Slivers of coconut frond stems are then placed on top of the hot rocks, leaving a surface for the food. The food is added and covered with large, heart shaped Via (Samaon taro) leaves.  Our lovo favorites are dalo (taro) and cassava (tapioca). We also love uvi and tivoli, which are both wild yams. All of these root vegetables are placed at the top of the lovo. Everything is covered and left to cook for about an hour. Preparing the love

After dinner, yaqona is served. This is the drink made from the root of the kava plant, native to the Western Pacific. It is commonly known by the Tongan and Marquesan name kava and also as ‘awa in Hawaii and ava in Samoa. It has sedative and anesthetic properties, so it fits in perfectly with the laid back culture of the islands. Its key properties are relaxing without disrupting mental clarity- quite different from the effects of alcohol.

Yaqona is a huge part of culture and is used in medicine, ceremony, politics, religion and general socializing so it’s a must try for visitors to Fiji. Yaqona is shared in a communal carved bowl, called a tanoa and passed around in a half-shell of a coconut, called a bilo.

We love sitting around the kava bowl and hearing funny stories and beautiful music. We also love the good night's sleep we get after an evening of mixing yaqona!

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Fiji Day

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Fiji Day

fiji flag

October 10th marks Fiji Day in the Fiji Islands. This is the anniversary of two events. The first was October 10, 1874 when Fiji became a colony of England. Within a few years, the English sent indentured laborers from India to plant sugarcane in the islands. The second is October 10, 1970 when Fiji became politically independent of England.

That was the first day that Fiji’s flag as we know it today flew. The flag is blue, in reference to it’s location in the ocean with a Union flag in the top left corner, referencing the colonial history. The flag also features the coat of arms with two Fijian warriors on either side of the shield. Within the shield there is a lion holding a cocoa pod, sugarcane, a coconut palm, bananas, and a dove. Below the shield are the words, “Rerevaka na Kalou ka Doka na Tul" which means "Fear God and honor the Queen.”

Girl Fiji flags

Wouldn’t it be great to have a flag that portrayed Fiji’s diverse history and landscape beyond the relatively short history of British colonialism? We could say the same of most countries I’m sure. For Fiji day, my students designed new Fiji flags including their own symbols for love, respect, natural beauty, Fijian music, and community.

IMG_2484

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Visiting Vuna

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Visiting Vuna

Vuna children

This week. Paradise is full of dive groups, so we'll be leaving the grounds temporarily and staying at a BnB in Vuna village. Most of our coworkers live in Vuna village, about a 50-minute walk south of the resort. Vuna overlooks the ocean and Vuna reef, which is a top diving spot. The local children also enjoy the surfing by Vuna. Vuna reef sign Vuna view

Jack, Sepo and fam

We've previously visited after work for kava and music the other night. We took a sevusevu, dried and un-pounded root of the yaqona or kava plant.

Vuna visit

Music is a huge part of Fijian culture and it’s always amazing to be around. Jack has been joining in with the guitar and is learning many of the songs. We'll be sharing videos of some of the beautiful music soon!

Children serenading

Vuna children

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Coco-nutty Date Treats

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Coco-nutty Date Treats

Date rolls

Today in school, we tried this recipe for healthy date balls. In the classroom, I explained the meanings of the words “zest,” “fine,” and “ground,” and we reviewed the abbreviations for grams, teaspoon and tablespoon.date rollsThe recipe is straightforward and the kids did everything on their own except operate the blender!

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Painting in Paradise

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Painting in Paradise

Painting

Taveuni is full of inspiration. In our free time, Jack has been picking up the guitar and ukelele and I've been working on watercolors. Here are a couple Taveuni-inspired watercolors.IMG_1583 IMG_1588 IMG_1627 IMG_1211 Taveuni watercolor

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Art Class Selfies

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Art Class Selfies

kids pics

Several days ago, I took photos of my students and told them to do a silly face and include both of their hands in the frame. We did this in between classes and I did not tell them what this was for. I was aiming for images to use for this week’s Gustave Courbet inspired self-portrait. This week in school, we looked at the history of self-portraiture, and explored visual and narrative techniques employed by old masters and contemporary artists. Self Portrait in process  I gave the kids the printouts of their black and white photographs and they created a 1” grid. They then worked to recreate their images grid by grid. We had previously done a lesson on gray-scale and they used their gray-scale cutouts to help find the lightest and darkest parts of their photographs, and illustrate highlights and shadows.

The final results were great- really cool compositions that they were proud of! Self Portrait 2 Self Portrait 1IMG_1502

***I may have helped on one of these.

 

 

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Tagimoucia Festival

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Tagimoucia Festival

Yesterday we joined in the festivities of the 2nd annual Tagimoucia Festival in Wairiki. The festival is named for the Tagimoucia flower, which is only found on the island of Taveuni. The community came together to celebrate the culture and to support the conservation, protection and clean up of the Fiji islands. Keep Taveuni Clean banner

We joined for the full day yesterday, which catered to the local school children. There were free workshops for dance, music, and visual arts as well as information booths and rides. Last night, they had a mini fashion show and live music. There was an even bigger setup today with more performances going on tonight.

We spent the morning painting faces, and spent the afternoon learning about all of the exciting initiatives happening. It was inspiring to see the local arts, organic farming, recycling, renewable energy, and yoga here on Taveuni and the surrounding islands.

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Latest Designs

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Latest Designs

Taveuni Activities Map

Jack's been busy in Paradise, working on new designs. He's been creating maps, brochures, technical drawings, and ads for web and print. Here's a glimpse of his latest work:map1Taveuni Activities Map Paradisewireframe isometricview

Lotlfinal 50percentcc 4nightcc

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Celebrations in Wairiki

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Celebrations in Wairiki

Fijian Dancers

Taveuni was buzzing last week as the Church of the Holy Cross is hosted the 150th anniversary celebration of Catholicism in Fiji. People from all over Fiji came to celebrate and worship together, sharing in prayer, music, dance and food. main stage

The beautiful church sat as a backdrop to the festivities and the Crucifix that is usually inside is on display outside of the church. The Crucifix was given to Ratu Goleanavanua, Tui Cakau and Patamount Chief of Cakaudrove, Bua, Macuata and the Yatu Lau by the Rev. Laurent Favre (Father Lorosio) in 1862.

Cathedral

The Crucifix inspired the Tui Cakau to defeat the Tongans under Ma’afu led by his warrior Wainiqolo. The people of Cakaudrove converted to Catholocism, crediting the Crucifix and the faith that it represented to have led to their victory.

Following the victory, Ratu Golea gave the crucifix to Tui Tunuloa for safekeeping.

In 1892, the Church of the Holy Cross was built, The beautiful structure is 60 metres high and overlooks a campus and the Pacific Ocean. On September 14, 2005, after 143 years, the Tui Tunuloa, Ratu Igenasio Loaloa returned the Crucifx to the Tui Cakau, Rat Naiqama Lalabalavu, in Wairiki.

The Tui Cakau then traditionally handed it over to His Grace Archbishop Petero Mataca D.D. for safekeeping. His Grace ordered that it be kept in the Church of the Holy Cross, Wairiki for veneration by the people of Cakaudrove.

group picture cross

We joined the celebration on Wednesday, which was a day especially for the children. There was music, dancing and trivia. We went back on Saturday, which was the biggest day, beginning with a church service led by the Archbishop and continuing with dances throughout the day.

Rabian Dancers Fijian Dancers

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Joey, the Fijian fruit bat

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Joey, the Fijian fruit bat

Joey the fruit bat

Joey the fruit bat Last week, Jack found a small fruit bat (aka flying fox) hanging near our room. He was on a dead coconut branch with his head touching the ground. Jack moved him to a higher branch and fed him some mango using a Fijian sasa (bristle used for a  broom). The next day, he was still there, so we checked on him and Jack fed him again. On the third day, we didn’t see him so we’d hoped he flew away to safety. Later that evening, we heard him chirping and followed the sound to a low branch in the Mango tree. We’re not sure if he flew or if someone kindly moved him there. Now, he chirps when he hears our voices and we’ve been feeding him with mango and water. We’re calling him Joey, since he resembles our Zoey. We think he’s very young, and are hoping that he’s flying independently soon.

Jack feeding Joey Mango

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Vegan + Paleo Coconut Cookies

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Vegan + Paleo Coconut Cookies

Cropped Cookies

Jack and I are in our third week of living and working in Fiji, and we’re getting into the swing of things. Teaching only two students presents so many opportunities and I love coming up with creative activities for them. This week, we made cookies as an end of the week treat. It’s a nice way to get the kids to voluntarily read, write, and measure while working as a team.

Kids and cookies

We managed to successfully make three types of cookies without using any eggs, butter, flour, processed sugar, or grains.  We have access to fresh coconut and coconut oil so this inspired our ingredient lists.

I didn’t make cookies often in the States, because I usually found eggless recipes failed to stick together, but all three of the recipes we made today stuck together nicely! And the steps were easy. Enjoy!

Kids and cookies

Vegan/Paleo Coco-nutty Cookies (10-12 cookies)

2 cups Almond Flour 1 cup Desiccated Coconut ¼ Cup Almonds ¼ Cup Macadamia Nuts ¼ Cup Coconut oil ¼ Cup Agave (or Maple Syrup) 1 Tbs water 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract (optional) ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon sea salt (optional)

1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and preparing our baking sheet with coconut oil.

2. In a food processor or blender, process the almonds and macadamia nuts into small, coarse pieces.

3. Combine the processed nuts, Almond flour, desiccated coconut, baking soda and sea salt into a large bowl.

4. In a separate bowl, combine the coconut oil, agave and vanilla extract.

5. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing well.

6. Roll the mixture into golf-sized balls and space them evenly on a baking sheet.

7. Bake for 15 minutes.

Kids and cookies

Vegan/Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies

1 Cup Almond Flour 1 Cup Coconut Flour ¼ Cup Coconut oil ¼ Cup dark chocolate chips 3 Tbs Agave (or Maple Syrup) 2 Tbs Cocoa Powder (or Cacao Powder) 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon sea salt (optional)

1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and preparing our baking sheet with coconut oil.

2. Combine the Almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda and sea salt into a large bowl.

3. In a separate bowl, combine the coconut oil, agave and vanilla extract.

4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing well.

5. Mix in the chocolate chips.

6. Roll the mixture into golf-sized balls and space them evenly on a baking sheet.

7. Bake for 15 minutes.

Kids and cookies

Vegan Paleo Cocoa Cookies

1 Cup Almond Flour 1 Cup Coconut Flour ¼ Cup Coconut oil 3 Tbs Agave (or Maple Syrup) 2 Tbs Cocoa Powder (or Cacao Powder) 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon sea salt (optional)

1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and preparing our baking sheet with coconut oil.

2. Combine the Almond flour, coconut flour, cacao powder, baking soda and sea salt into a large bowl.

3. In a separate bowl, combine the coconut oil, agave and vanilla extract.

4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing well.

5. Roll the mixture into golf-sized balls and space them evenly on a baking sheet.

6. Bake for 15 minutes.

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Bouma Falls Daytrip

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Bouma Falls Daytrip

Bouma Falls

We’ve just completed our first week of work at Paradise Taveuni! Check out the Paradise blogpost Jack posted here: fijiresort.blogspot.com Paradise Taveuni is located on the Southern Side of Taveuni. We made our first day trip north to Bouma Falls with five kids and a group of resort guests. It took a couple of hours by car, with stops along the way.

Taveuni views Our first stop was the beautiful cathedral, which is celebrating 150 years next week.

Cathedral

Our next stop was at the International Date Line. Here we were able to stand in today and yesterday.

180 Meridian Then we made it to Bouma Falls. There were three waterfall stops and we hiked to the first two.  The walks were beautiful and good exercise. The water was very cold, but it felt refreshing after the journey.

Jack jumping at the falls Jack and Alise at Bouma Falls

On the way back, we stopped at the natural waterslide. The water here was warmer…or maybe we were just acclimated by that point.

Natural water slide

It was a nice, full day and the kids were knocked out for the trip back. We’re looking forward to exploring more of this beautiful island!

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Travel Week

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Travel Week

IMG_0452

Bula from Taveuni, Fiji! This week was a long one, full of travel. Sunday, we flew from San Francisco (SFO) to Los Angeles (LAX) then to Nadi, Fiji (NAN). Packing food is always a challenge for us, but luckily we’ve found a go-to gem in LAX. It’s called “Real Food Daily: Organic Plant-Based Cuisine” and it’s in Terminal 4, where American Airlines is. Real Food Daily

We stumbled upon it when we were coming back from Fiji last December. They serve large portions of fresh organic vegan meals with toppings like cashew cheese and avocado.

LAX Bowl and Southwest Salad

We had the LAX Bowl, the Southwest Salad and a bottle of water and the total came to around $40. It’s definitely steep (airport prices!), but the portions were huge, and held us over through our 11 hour flight.

We arrived in Nadi on Tuesday morning. We caught a bus from Nadi to Suva and spent time with family on both sides. We spent Tuesday night on Jack’s parents’ farm in Naitasiri and then flew out of  Nausori (near Suva) airport on Wednesday afternoon. The plane had 7 rows, so we sat right behind the Captain and First officer.

Our plane

View from the plane

We arrived into Taveuni’s Matei airport late Wednesday afternoon and met our coworker who drove us to the resort. We arrived after dark so we weren’t able to do much exploring.

Matei airport

Thursday morning we woke up and were able to see the beauty of the resort. I’m pretty surprised at how cold it is. Luckily, Jack had me pack a hoodie and a cardigan; otherwise I’d be freezing! We've jumped right into work so we’ll be getting organized and posting more soon!

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New adventures

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New adventures

Savu Mural

IMG_7950 Bula family and friends! We're excited to announce that we will temporarily be moving to the island of Taveuni in Fiji!

We will both be working and living at Paradise Taveuni, a resort on the Southern side of Taveuni. Taveuni is the third largest island in Fiji, known as the Garden Island for its flora. Jack will be working as a web developer, and Alise will be teaching the resort owners' children. We could not have dreamed up a more fitting opportunity!

In our free time, we plan to explore vegan food options and growing and composting in Taveuni. We plan to create art, inspired by our experiences. We also plan to do a good bit of exploring, swimming and diving. And of course, we will take heaps of photos and journal along the way so that we can keep this updated.

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We'll be taking a break from our Etsy shop but our art and jewelry will still be available in a few locations. Contact us for more details!

With new opportunities come uncertainty, and we’ve been consistently working to embrace the changes and transform our fears into loving situations. We’re blessed to have such a strong support system of family and friends. Alise’s parents are caring for our pup Zoey in California and Jack’s parents are looking out for us in Fiji.

We fly out in July. Until then, we are living and working in the East Bay, getting Zoey settled in with Alise's parents. Stay tuned for updates!

Love, light, and lolomas!

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